PERPETUUM & MOUVEMENT (2006)

PERPETUUM & MOUVEMENT (2006)

for organ and electronics

instrumentation: org, elec
duration: 10 minutes
première: March 13, 2007, SWR Baden-Baden, Rosbaud-Studio, Germany
Carsten Wiebusch – organ and electronics (Perpetuum)

Electronics produced in ComputerStudio at the University of Music Karlsruhe
Awarded VERS.1.3 »Förderpreis für elektronische Musik in der Kirche«

PERPETUUM & MOUVEMENT

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PERPETUUM

(full recording)

Christuskirche Karlsruhe
Carsten Wiebusch – organ and electronics
Recording published on CD – Crosscourt by Edicije DSS

Additional performances

June 30, 2010, Haus der Deutschen Ensemble Akademie, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
April 18, 2008, Slovenian Philharmonics, The Marjan Kozina Hall, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Tomaž Sevšek – organ and electronics (Perpetuum)
June 15, 2007, Stiftskirche Stuttgart
Carsten Wiebusch – organ and electronics (Perpetuum)

ABOUT

The Organ, a large, implacable and infinitely complex mechanical beast of an instrument, lends itself like no other to blending with electronics. In PERPETUUM, the sound of the organ is blended with electronic samples, which realise possibilities unknown to the acoustic instrument, such as glissandi, microtones and filtering, as though they were a perfectly part of the instrument itself. As its title insinuates, much of the composition takes the form of a Perpetuum mobile, a seemingly ceaseless motoric rhythm that drives the music forward. This alternates with massive chordal aggregates, making the work a sort of modern and grandiose toccata.

MOUVEMENT is a short, single-movement work for organ. Its timbres are dominated especially by trills and clusters in the stratospheric 1′ register of the organ. The high clusters produce an audible interference that is almost as prominent as the notes themselves, resulting in a highly unconventional sound. In MOUVEMENT, these timbres tend to be used in conjunction with very rapid, ornamental figurations. A second, contrasting musical element consists of repeated chords, stacked in thirds and layered over each other in contrasting rhythmic proportions. These disparate and often elusive elements are frequently held together by sustained pedal points. These last, however, vanish just before the end, leaving the piece to taper off into the stratosphere.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

Crosscourt (2008)

Published by Edicije DSS

Slovenian Philharmonic, RIAS Kammerchor, various artists

recorded pieces:
ODTRG, PERPETUUM, AIRPHONES, CONCERTINO, CROSSCOURT, SPRICH AUCH DU, CONCERTO, IN MEDIAS RES

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