TANGO (2000)

TANGO (2000)

for flute and orchestra

solo: fl
orchestra: 2.2.2.2/2.2.1.0/timp/2perc/arp/10.8.6.4.2
duration: 6 min
première: June 12, 2006, Slovenian Philharmonic, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Slovenian Philharmonics Orchestra, Matej Grahek – flute
Conducted by George Pehlivanian

TANGO (2000)

for flute and piano

instrumentation: fl/vno, pno
duration: 6 min
première: March 7, 2000, Radio Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Elena Hribernik – flute, Marko Hribernik – piano

TANGO

score preview

TANGO

score preview

TANGO for flute and orchestra

(excerpt)

June 12, 2006, Slovenian Philharmonic, Ljubljana (première)
Slovenian Philharmonics Orchestra, Matej Grahek – flute
Conducted by George Pehlivanian
Produced by Radio Slovenia

TANGO for flute and piano

(full recording)

April 17, 2001, SNG Maribor, Kazina Hall
Matej Grahek – flute, Vito Žuraj – piano

Additional performances
Tango for flute and orchestra
June 14, 2017, Congress Square, Ljubljana, Slovenia
RTV Slovenia Symphony Orchestra
Robert Pogorilić – flute
Conducted by Mojca Lavreni
Tango for flute and orchestra
October 27 & 28, 2016, Theater Erfurt, Germany
Philharmonisches Orchester Erfurt
Matvey Demin – flute
Conducted by Joana Mallwitz
Tango for flute and orchestra
April 25, 2013, SNG Maribor, Grand Hall, Slovenia
Symphony Orchestra SNG Maribor
Eva Slana – flute solo
Conducted by Simon Dvoršak
Tango for flute and piano
June 5, 2016, Teatro Argentino de la Plata, Argentina
Ensemble Modern
Tango for flute and piano
May 17, 2014, 10th Slovenian Flute Festival Zagorje, Slovenia
Elena Hribernik – flute, Marko Hribernik – piano
Tango for flute and piano
April 17th, 2001, Maribor, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
May 8, 2000, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
September 29, 2000, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
March 14, 2001, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
September 26, 2001, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
February 10, 2002, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
March 31, 2003, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
May 5, 2003, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
August 29, 2001, Velenje, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
August 25, 2000, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
July 12, 2002, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
December 29, 2002, Rae, Slovenia
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
December 12, 2001, Dresden, Germany
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
June 4, 2002, Salzburg, Austria
Performed by various artists
Tango for flute and piano
January 27, 2003, Luzern, Switzerland
Performed by various artists

VIDEO

TANGO: Full recording
February 8th, 2018, Haute Ecole de Musique de Lausanne
Lara Šalamon – flute, Gaia Federica Caporiccio – piano
TANGO: Full recording
February 8th, 2018, Haute Ecole de Musique de Lausanne
Lara Šalamon – flute, Gaia Federica Caporiccio – piano

ABOUT

TANGO, one of Žuraj’s earliest compositions, is a virtuoso caprice for melodic instrument (versions exist for flute, clarinet, violin and viola) and piano. Drawing on the familiar rhythmic characteristics and arabesque melodic idiom of the Tango, the work has a free, rhapsodic form, with a dramatic introduction subsiding into a calmer main theme with a slinky, almost serpentine melody wending its way over a tango accompaniment. There follows a contrasting middle section, which frees itself from the rhythms of the tango accompaniment and takes on a driving character with rhythmic patterns at times redolent of other latin-american dances such as the rumba, but in the end always just eluding definition. Following this, the serpentine melodic strains of the opening return, before the driving rhythms of the middle section take over in a frenzied coda that brings the work to a close.

The orchestral version of the work is dominated by chordal figures in woodwinds and especially brass, and liberal use of soloists to create almost chamber-musical contrasts. Appropriately, the principal melodic lines are dominated by the flute.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

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