OVERGRIP (2010)

OVERGRIP (2010)

for orchestra

orchestra: 2*.2*.2.2/3.2.2.0/timp*/perc/10.10.6.6.4
duration: 5 minutes
première: July 16, 2010, Acanthes, Metz Arsenal, France
Orchestre National de Lorraine
Conducted by Jacques Mercier

OVERGRIP

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OVERGRIP

(excerpt)

July 16, 2010, Acanthes, Metz Arsenal, France (première)
Orchestre National de Lorraine, Conducted by Jacques Mercier

Additional performances

December 22 & 23, 2016, Theater Erfurt, Germany
Philharmonisches Orchester Erfurt
Conducted by Joana Mallwitz
June 1, 2016, Slovenian Philharmonic, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Slovenian Philharmonic
Conducted by Simon Krei

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OVERGRIP: Full recording
June 1, 2016, Slovenian Philharmonic, Ljubljana
Slovenian Philharmonic
Conducted by Simon Krečič
Recording ©2016 by Rok Golob
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OVERGRIP: Full recording
June 1, 2016, Slovenian Philharmonic, Ljubljana
Slovenian Philharmonic
Conducted by Simon Krei

ABOUT

The orchestral composition OVERGRIP represents a continuation of Žuraj’s series of compositions with titles drawn from tennis terminology. The term ‘overgrip’ refers to a band of padded tape placed around the grip of a tennis racquet, which moulds itself to the shape of the player’s hand and helps absorb sweat. Tennis players often twirl the racquet back and forth in their hands unconsciously while awaiting their opponent’s serve.

The accentuated figures at the opening of the present work may be understood as a reference to this rapid movement, as may the ensuing, pointillistic orchestral tutti, that gives a sort of ‘action replay’ of these twirling gestures in slow motion. This, in its turn, is followed by an eve slower ‘twirling’, in which a series of quieter moments alternates with abrupt outbursts of the previous tutti texture, each more violent than the last, until the work ends with a vicious crescendo flourish.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

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