MATRIX (2013)

MATRIX (2013)

for Yamaha Disklavier and live-electronics

instrumentation: pno*, elec
duration: 7 minutes
première: September 7, 2013, Utrecht, Netherlands
Gaudeamus Muziekweek Utrecht, Netherlands
Vito Žuraj – live-performance

Commissioned by Gaudeamus Muziekweek Utrecht
Electronics produced in ComputerStudio at the University of Music Karlsruhe

MATRIX

University of Music Karlsruhe, ComputerStudio
Vito Žuraj – live-electronics

Additional performances

March 13, 2016, Archipel Genéve, Switzerland
Vito Žuraj – live-performance
June 21, 2015, Foundation Royaumont, France
Vito Žuraj – live-performance
August 14, 2014, Darmstadt Summer Course, Germany
Vito Žuraj – live-performance
July 3, 2014, Viitasaari Time of Music, Finland
Vito Žuraj – live-performance

VIDEO

MATRIX: Full recording
August 14, 2014 at Darmstadt Summer Course
Vito Žuraj – live-performance
MATRIX: Full recording
August 14, 2014 at Darmstadt Summer Course
Vito Žuraj – live-performance

ABOUT

MATRIX was written for the Ulysses Network’s project “Disklavier Plus” in 2013 and was performed at important festivals such as the Gaudeamus Music Week and the International Summer Courses in Darmstadt. The project saw a series of works produced for Yamaha’s “Disklavier” (a form of automated grand piano) and electronics. In the case of MATRIX, the electronic component is a piano sampler, which supplements the tuning of the piano by adding quarter-tones between the semitones of the Disklavier keyboard.

In contrast to Žuraj’s normal compositional method, MATRIX does not have a predetermined form, but is instead a live performance in which compositional parameters such as tempo, intervals, textural density and volume are manipulated by means of MIDI controls.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

MATRIX was written for the Ulysses Network’s project “Disklavier Plus” in 2013 and was performed at important festivals such as the Gaudeamus Music Week and the International Summer Courses in Darmstadt. The project saw a series of works produced for Yamaha’s “Disklavier” (a form of automated grand piano) and electronics. In the case of MATRIX, the electronic component is a piano sampler, which supplements the tuning of the piano by adding quarter-tones between the semitones of the Disklavier keyboard. In contrast to Žuraj’s normal compositional method, MATRIX does not have a predetermined form, but is instead a live performance in which compositional parameters such as tempo, intervals, textural density and volume are manipulated by means of MIDI controls.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

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