INSIDEOUT (2013)

INSIDEOUT (2013)

for soprano, baritone and ensemble
Libretto by Alexander Stockinger
French translation of libretto by Bernard Banoun
English translation of libretto by Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

voice: S + Bar
ensemble: 1.1.1.1*/1.1.1.0./2perc/pno/arp/1.1.1.1.1
duration: 10 minutes
première: August 24, 2013, Salzburger Festspiele, Mozerteum, Austria
Mojca Erdmann – soprano, Dietrich Henschel – baritone
Scharoun Ensemble Berlin, conducted by Matthias Pintscher

Commissioned by Salzburger Festspiele for Beyond Recall Art Project Salzburg

INSIDEOUT

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INSIDEOUT

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INSIDEOUT

Libretto in German (excerpt)

August 24, 2013, Salzburger Festspiele, Mozerteum, Austria (première)
Mojca Erdmann – soprano, Dietrich Henschel – baritone
Scharoun Ensemble Berlin, conducted by Matthias Pintscher

INSIDEOUT

Libretto in French (excerpt)

April 9, 2016, Philharmonie de Paris
Yeree Suh – soprano, Jarrett Ott – baritone
Ensemble Intercontemporain, conducted by Matthias Pintscher

Additional performances

April 9, 2016, Philharmonie de Paris, Grande salle Pierre Boulez (French version)
Yeree Suh – soprano,
Jarrett Ott – baritone,
Ensemble Intercontemporain, conducted by Matthias Pintscher

May 29 & 31, 2014, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA (English version)
Jennifer Zetlan – soprano,
Evan Hughes – baritone,
New York Philharmonic,
conducted by Matthias Pintscher

ABOUT

INSIDEOUT is a semi-theatrical work presenting the potentially never-ending cycle of a man and a woman falling in and out of love with each other. Initially hopelessly enamoured of each other, they are torn apart, as first she rejects him, then he learns to reject her even as her love for him is rekindled. The different characters of the two protagonists are presented contrastingly both in their language and in their singing style, he being slow and deliberate, she rapid and imaginative. The work’s structure consists of an instrumental introduction and three principal sections: the lovers’ first encounter, a love scene, the lovers’ estrangement.

The vocal style is carefully conceived with a view to clarity and intelligibility, although this is employed in diverse ways. In the first section, the lovers sing over each other and at cross purposes, the text being understandable in snippets. The love scene is a true love duet, with lines repeated and the two lovers singing simultaneously, but with clear gestures at a tempo that speaks clearly and directly. The final section incorporates considerable spoken passages and a more matter-of fact, conversational style. There follows a brief instrumental postlude. The handling of the instrumental ensemble throughout is highly colouristic and expressive – almost orchestral, without ever attempting to overshadow the signers.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

INSIDEOUT is a semi-theatrical work presenting the potentially never-ending cycle of a man and a woman falling in and out of love with each other. Initially hopelessly enamoured of each other, they are torn apart, as first she rejects him, then he learns to reject her even as her love for him is rekindled. The different characters of the two protagonists are presented contrastingly both in their language and in their singing style, he being slow and deliberate, she rapid and imaginative. The work’s structure consists of an instrumental introduction and three principal sections: the lovers’ first encounter, a love scene, the lovers’ estrangement.

The vocal style is carefully conceived with a view to clarity and intelligibility, although this is employed in diverse ways. In the first section, the lovers sing over each other and at cross purposes, the text being understandable in snippets. The love scene is a true love duet, with lines repeated and the two lovers singing simultaneously, but with clear gestures at a tempo that speaks clearly and directly. The final section incorporates considerable spoken passages and a more matter-of fact, conversational style. There follows a brief instrumental postlude. The handling of the instrumental ensemble throughout is highly colouristic and expressive – almost orchestral, without ever attempting to overshadow the signers.

Alwyn Tomas Westbrooke

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